Is Malware the Achilles Heel of the IIoT?

Insiderlogo3Is Malware the Achilles Heel of the IIoT?
By Walt Boyes

(Originally published in the December 2017 Industrial Automation and Process Control INSIDER)

The big appeal of the Industrial Internet of Things is the potential vast increase of meaningful information we could obtain by increasing the sheer number of sensors and the analytical methodologies of Big Data and the latest visualization tools for working with that data. The central axiom of the IIoT is that this information will be used to operate plants and even entire enterprises much more profitably.

There are some obvious problems with this axiom, It is pretty glaring that you have to collect the right information. It doesn’t help to add 100 or 1000 sensors to a process if the values of those sensors aren’t critical information. The problems don’t stop there.

We have pointed out before that the cost of sensors must decrease dramatically be- fore the IIoT can become a reality. I remember hearing a friend from Shell saying that if they needed a measurement, they’d be willing to pay for it. The flip side of that is that if the cost of making those measurements goes down substantially, the impetus for needing the measurement goes up.

But the real issue that IIoT boosters don’t want to talk about is security.
There are two basic schools of thought about IIoT security. One is that nobody would try to penetrate a network through its edge devices. The other is that the problem is so large that it is basically unsolvable, so who cares.

The first school of thought is the same old “security by obscurity” nonsense. Our concepts of cyber security have been formed by network-centric security experts. There have been some lonely security researchers, like Joe Weiss, and others like the INSIDER who have been pointing this bias out for years. And for years, we have noticed a steadily growing number of “security researchers” at Blackhat and other gatherings, who have concentrated their research on network penetration through the sensor network.

The other school of thought is much more pervasive and even more insidious. This claim is the reason that there is always the next patch coming out for software. You can’t solve the problem because there are always smarter black hats.

Somehow, it seems to us, that both schools of thought are missing the point. Which is that if the potential users of the Industrial Internet of Things see that from a cost-benefit viewpoint the potential loss from an attack far outweighs the potential gain from all that beautiful information, adoption of the IIoT will stall.

We are already seeing this in the commercial IoT world. Sales of Nest thermostats and household control systems have stalled. People are concerned. Now, with the latest revelations about inherent design flaws in Intel, AMD, and other processor chips, they are becoming frightened. All they can see to do is to pray that nobody ever attacks them. And we see the same fear in the industrial space.
So, if the IIoT is to be a success, we have to focus on two things. First and foremost, we need to make security inherent in every de- vice and the firmware and software that runs on them, from field sensor to process controller to MES and ERP systems.

And, second, we need to focus on providing the right information at the right time, or there will be no value add with the IIoT.
End users vote with their feet, and their dollars, pounds, euros, pesos and yuan. For all the ballyhooed new IIoT centric plants, there are dozens more built to the old standards, because we are sure that they work, and the perceived risk is less.

Change the risk and the IIoT will grow to its potential.

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One thought on “Is Malware the Achilles Heel of the IIoT?

  1. Pingback: Is Malware the Achilles Heel of the IIoT? – MeasurementDevices in Industry and Science

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